Posts Tagged ‘Family’

Using a Kansas Visitation Schedule

November 10th, 2022

It is essential to have an understanding of the laws regarding child custody and visitation in the state of Kansas before you create your visitation schedule. Learning these laws will help prepare you for making the schedule and also so you know what to expect in court. Kansas family laws regarding custody and visitation can be found in Chapter 60,Guest Posting Article 16 of the Kansas Statutes Annotated. Here you will find the definitions of the different types of custodial arrangements and also the different kinds of residential arrangements. According to the law, Kansas does not favor parental gender when awarding custodial rights and responsibilities. Both parents are considered equal and there is no presumption that infants and babies are better off with their mother. The main factor the court considers is the child’s best interests. The court looks at the following criteria when determining what is in the best interests of the child:

Each parent’s custodial preferences;

The child’s wishes he/she is of appropriate age and maturity to voice a preference;

The previously established relationships between each parent and the child and any other people who are important in the child’s life;

The child’s residential and care giving history;

How well the child has adapted to his/her current home, school and community;

Each parent’s willingness and capability to recognize the importance of the other parent in the child’s life;

Each parent’s willingness to help foster a meaningful and continuing relationship between the child and the other parent;

Any evidence of child or spousal abuse; and

Whether either parent, any person living in the parent’s home or in close contact with the child is a registered sex offender.

Kansas, the Sunflower State, at a Glance

April 1st, 2022

Many people don’t know that the history of Kansas runs as wide as the Kansas river. In this article, we’ll be taking a brief tour of the history of Kansas. The state that was filled with clashes, tensions, railroads, industrial advancements and more.

The history of Kansas, which became the 34th state of the union in 1861, is filled with drama. It was home to Native Americans for over 14,000 years before explorers discovered the area, which occurred between about 1550 and 1740. During this time, the explorers were in search of precious metals, and information about the area. But it wasn’t until 1803, when Kansas became part of the Louisiana purchase, that it was officially organized as part of an official territory.

The more violent area of Kansas gave it its nickname “Bleeding Kansas.” The conflicts arose over the topic of slavery, and led to many violent battles throughout the civil war. However, when Kansas joined as a free state, the conflict ended.

The tensions didn’t end with the Civil War, however. There were many clashes between the white settlers and the Native Americans, who were both suspicious of each other. This lead to the creation of military enforcement to protect both parties. This lead to the formation of other industrial buildings, such as churches, schools; and Kansas was quickly growing.

To further the growth of Kansas, the Union Pacific railroad stretched as far west as Colorado by 1870. With the trains came the famous cattle drives that transformed areas, such as Wichita, into major distribution centers. And soon after, it was discovered that wheat, brought by Russian settlers in 1874, was ideally suited for the Kansas climate and soil. This was undoubtedly one of the biggest milestones in Kansas’ history – as even today it is known for it’s wheat farming. It wasn’t long after this discovery that Kansas became the nation’s leading producer of wheat.

As the industrial revolution spread across the country, advancements such as oil production and mining, as well as discovery of natural gas, further boosted the economy and development of Kansas. In addition, the advancements of aircraft manufacturing, meatpacking and others lead to the further development of this area in the central United States.